Omaha Divided 

By: Brandon Beaber, Travis Starkey, and Matthew Bowen


Omaha Divided

Omaha is separated traditionally on maps and often referred to by the public and in the news by their naturally given names from when they were developed. Starting in central Omaha, then of course north, south, west, etc… We have shown the separation of Omaha in a different way; by income, population, resources, and overall way of life. Each section of Omaha has been broken down and compared to each other in this manner. With the information we have provided, you will be able to see how each section has its similarities and differences.


Public Schools in Omaha

West Omaha 25
South Omaha 35
North Omaha 17
Central Omaha 43
Millard 30
Elkhorn 10
Total 160
Private Schools in Omaha
West Omaha 10
South Omaha 15
North Omaha 8
Central Omaha 18
Millard 7
Elkhorn 1
Total 59
Average Household Income In Omaha
North Omaha $52,000
Central Omaha $47,000
South Omaha $56,000
West Omaha $88,000
Millard $97,000
Elkhorn $115,000
Estimated Population In Omaha
North Omaha 125,000
Central Omaha 209,000
South Omaha 162,000
West Omaha 133,000
Millard 95,000
Elkhorn 62,000
Average Household Income
North Omaha $52,000
Central Omaha $47,000
South Omaha $56,000
West Omaha $88,000
Millard $97,000
Elkhorn $115,000
Total # of Households in Omaha
North Omaha 49,000
Central Omaha 85,000
South Omaha 64,000
West Omaha 55,000
Millard 36,000
Elkhorn 23,000
Estimated Population In Omaha
North Omaha 125,000
Central Omaha 209,000
South Omaha 162,000
West Omaha 133,000
Millard 95,000
Elkhorn 62,000
Cemetares In Omaha
West Omaha 1
South Omaha 9
North Omaha 2
Central Omaha 2
Millard 1
Elkhorn 0
Total 15
Hospitals In Omaha
West Omaha 0
South Omaha 1
North Omaha 1
Central Omaha 6
Millard 1
Elkhorn 1
Total 10
Number Of Notable Shopping centers In Omaha
North Omaha 1 North Park Shopping Center
Central Omaha 3 Village Shopping Center, Crossroads, and Parkfair Shopping Center
South Omaha 3 Center Mall, Frederick Square, and One Pacfic Place
West Omaha 1 West Roads Mall
Millard 1 Oak View Mall
Elkhorn 0
Lakes and Reservoirs In Omaha
North Omaha 1 Carter lake
Central Omaha 0
South Omaha 1 Lake Regency
West Omaha 3 Standing Bear Lake, Standing Bear Reservoir, and Boys Town Reservoir.
Millard 1 Zorinsky
Elkhorn 1 Whitehawk Lake
Streams, Rivers, and Creeks In Omaha
North Omaha 2 Mill Creek, and Thomas Creek
Central Omaha 2 Cole Creek, and Elmwood Creek
South Omaha 3 Little Papillion Creek, Blood Creek, and Cementary Creek
West Omaha 1 Eagle Run Creek
Millard 0
Elkhorn 0

SIDs

  • A Sanitary and Improvement District (SID) is created when a developer buys land for a housing development. The SID can install streets, sewers and power, and can also buy land for public parks. SID’s are generally a good thing and provide a structure and identity for a specific area.

Total Number of SIDs
West Omaha 75
North Omaha 6
South Omaha 1
Central Omaha 0
Millard 32
Elkhorn 25

Crime in Omaha

  • Information on crime is a bit scarce, as it is usually only shown in an annual manner. We have concentrated our efforts towards stating the crime statistics of Omaha and their relevancy when considering what crimes are most likely to happen in specific areas.

Assualts in omaha
West Omaha 3
North Omaha 3
South Omaha 3
Central Omaha 4
Millard 2
Elkhorn 0
Burglary in Omaha
West Omaha 1
North Omaha 0
South Omaha 1
Central Omaha 5
Millard 0
Elkhorn 0
Theft in Omaha
West Omaha 8
North Omaha 8
South Omaha 11
Central Omaha 18
Millard 7
Elkhorn 0
Shootings in Omaha
West Omaha 0
North Omaha 1
South Omaha 0
Central Omaha 1
Millard 0
Elkhorn 0
Vandalism in Omaha
West Omaha 1
North Omaha 2
South Omaha 12
Central Omaha 9
Millard 0
Elkhorn 0

South Omaha vs. Central Omaha

  • When comparing these 2 sections of Omaha you will notice many similarities. These two have the 2 greatest percentages of the following: population, households, hospitals, cemeteries, assaults, thefts, vandalism, and burglary. They also have the 2 lowest percentages of lakes, reservoirs, SIDs, and average income. This essentially tells us that these two areas have a very high density of both people and buildings. They are also clearly lacking in the few areas that most people would consider most valuable to their standard of living. From a sociological perspective this tells us that these two sections are clearly part of the lower class. As discussed in David Malmusi’s book “Gender Inequalities in Health: Exploring the Contribution Of Living Conditions In The Intersection Of Social Class”, the lower class, on average ranked their residential environment lower than any other class on a scale from 1-10. Both South and Central Omaha have taken on many characteristics of a lower class society.

Millard vs. North Omaha

  • When looking at Millard and North Omaha one striking difference is their population density and crime rates. Millard has on average 1 less person per household and had lower crime rates in every single category when compared with North Omaha. This can be explained by humans behavior when put in a more crowded living situation. Increased crowding leads to more aggressive responses among individuals (Wendy). Therefore, because North Omaha is much more crowded we should expect people to act in a more aggressive manner.

West Omaha vs. Central Omaha

  • When comparing these 2 sections there is one particular statistic that really stands out, and that is that West Omaha contains 75 Sanitation Improvement Districts while Central Omaha contains 0. This is an enormous difference especially considering they are similar in size. In order to explain this difference we simply need to look at the income of both of the sections. After doing this you will see that West Omaha has nearly double the average income as Central Omaha. From here we know that this is an example of social stratification. West Omaha is clearly ranked higher in society, from a sociological point of view. The only reason that West Omaha has so many more SIDs (which are almost always considered good) is because they can afford them.

Elkhorn vs. North Omaha

  • When viewing these two sections we can easily see that although North Omaha has 2.5x as many people as Elkhorn, they only have 1.7x as many schools; meaning that individuals living in Elkhorn have a greater opportunity for schooling and likely a better education. This can be used to explain why the crime rate is so much higher in North Omaha. “Not only does an increase in wages for high school graduates or college attendees reduce crime for all youth who would have attained these schooling levels in the first place, but it also causes more youth to finish high school and attend college, lowering their lifetime criminal activity as well” (Lochner 3).

Millard vs. West Omaha

  • When comparing Millard and West Omaha, it is very apparent that both of these locations have a lot in common. Both areas are within the top three when considering average income, and have relatively low populations as well. Both locations have an adequate amount of schools relative to the population. Millard and West Omaha collectively have over more SIDs than all of the other regions combined, which may be partially relevant to the amount of wealth within the smaller populations. These particular regions have very low crime rate which seems to have a correspondence to the smaller populations and greater wealth. The only region with less crime than the two is Elkhorn, which has even more wealth and the smallest population out of all the regions.

Elkhorn vs. South Omaha

  • When comparing Elkhorn and South Omaha, it is very apparent that there are a lot of differences that may help explain the well-being of the particular neighborhoods. Both regions are averaging 2-3 people per household, but it is typical for residents of Millard homes have an income well over 200% of those living in South Omaha. South Omaha averages 3240 total population for every school available, while Elkhorn is averaging over 5600 people per school available. The amount of students per school does not seem to have an effect on the amount of wealth, or crime in the city of Omaha. South Omaha has a greater amount of attractions such as shopping centers and lakes/streams which may play a roll in it’s relatively high population. Crime collectively seems to be directly correlated with wealth and population. While Elkhorn has very low crime, South Omaha has relatively high amounts of crime, only exceeded by that of Central Omaha, the region with the greatest population and lowest average income.

Population/Crime in Omaha

When comparing the different sections of Omaha, it becomes very clear that the density of an area directly correlates with the amount or lack there of, crime.  North Omaha, South Omaha, and Central Omaha make up 63 percent of Omaha’s population and account for the majority of the crimes committed in Omaha.  Millard, Elkorn and West Omaha have a smaller population as well as lower crime rates.  You could assume that more people equal more crime, but why?  Researchers at the University of Chicago came up with what they called Social Disorganization theory, which states crime, is most likely to occur in communities with weak social ties and absence of social control.  The population of an area creates a large pool of different views and values that people can share or have and are less likely to come together over a certain topic or situation.  This in turn causes conflict and separation amongst the community or area, and increased crime rates. One reason why Social Disorganization theory doesn’t really apply in the smaller less populated areas of Omaha, I.E. West Omaha, Elkorn, millard, is that more people know and deal with each other on a daily basis, since a large portion of these cities go to the same schools, share a similar way of life, and have a larger sense of community pride, there is naturally less conflict.


Income/Resources/Location

When comparing Income levels among the sections of Omaha it becomes very easy to see the further away you get from the center of the city the higher the income becomes.  Listing the sections would go as such, Central, North, South, Omaha, West Omaha, Millard, and Elkorn.  Why is this??  Clifford Shaw and Henry McKay’s Cultural Deviance theory which is That violence and crime were at their worst in the middle of the city and gradually decreased the farther one traveled away.  No one wants to live around crime and violence, so when they have the means; they separate themselves from it, as the income statistics show.  SID’s are generally a good thing and are put in place to help maintain an areas condition.  A SID  can also be looked at as a deterrent to outsiders that because of income can’t meet terms of a SID.  Some SID’s in neighborhoods state amount of square foot your house needs to be whether your house needs a brick front and even down to the style of fence or roof shingle you’re allowed to use.  Having these standards only allow those who can afford them, to be a part of the neighborhood insuring similar values.


Citations

  • Regoeczi, Wendy C. 2002.   “The Impact of Density:  The Importance of Nonlinearity and Selection on Flight and Fight Response.” Social Forces 81:505-530.
  • Lochner, Lance. “Education and Crime.” University of Western Ontario(2007): 14. University of Western Ontario. Web.
  • Vaughan, Katherine, et al. “Exploring The Distribution Of Park Avilability, Features, And Quality Across Kansas City, Missouri By Income And Race/Ethnicity: An Environmental Justice Investigation.” Annais of Behavioral Medicine 45.(2013): 28-38. Academic Search Complete. Web 30 Mar. 2015
  • Shaikh, Anwar, Nikolaos Papaninkolaou, and Noe Wiener. “Race, Gender And The Econophysics of Income Distribution In The USA. “Physica A 415.(2014): 54-60. Academic Search Complete. Web. 30 Mar. 201

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